Publication: Visualisation of dCas9 target search in vivo using an open-microscopy framework

K.J.A. Martens, S. van Beljouw, S. van der Els, J.N.A. Vink, S. Baas, G.A. Vogelaar, S.J.J. Brouns, P. van Baarlen, M. Kleerebezem, J. Hohlbein, Nature Communications, 10, 3552, 2019, [link]

CRISPR-Cas9 is widely used in genomic editing, but the kinetics of target search and its relation to the cellular concentration of Cas9 have remained elusive. Effective target search requires constant screening of the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and a 30 ms upper limit for screening was recently found. To further quantify the rapid switching between DNA-bound and freely-diffusing states of dCas9, we developed an open-microscopy framework, the miCube, and introduce Monte-Carlo diffusion distribution analysis (MC-DDA). Our analysis reveals that dCas9 is screening PAMs 40% of the time in Gram-positive Lactoccous lactis, averaging 17 ± 4 ms per binding event. Using heterogeneous dCas9 expression, we determine the number of cellular target-containing plasmids and derive the copy number dependent Cas9 cleavage. Furthermore, we show that dCas9 is not irreversibly bound to target sites but can still interfere with plasmid replication. Taken together, our quantitative data facilitates further optimization of the CRISPR-Cas toolbox.

miCubeNatCommun

 

News: The miCube moved to Github

Our open (single-molecule) microscopy project, the #miCube, is now on Github [link]!  The page shows a detailed and updated overview of the components, some information on phasor-based SMLM, and many links to similar open hardware projects.

 

miCube V0.1: first tests

We finally managed to perform some test experiments and it is looking very promising! We tracked small fluorescent quantum dots (< 5 nm diameter) diffusing in water (20% glycerol) and we were happy to learn that even for such a demanding application new sCMOS-based cameras are doing just fine. Here a picture of the current assembly. More soon!

micubeassembled